click on the info­graphic to enlarge

Source

infographics, Personal Finance

infographics: the history of credit cards

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click the info­graphic to enlarge

Source H&R Block

infographics, Personal Finance

infographics: soaring gas prices

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Source: Pay­cor

infographics, Personal Finance

infographics: payroll taxes and deductions

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Personal Finance

you’re not new


 
I have to say, Ally bank is onto some­thing with its ad about treat­ing exist­ing cus­tomers to the same perks and ben­e­fits as new cus­tomers. As many of you know, about 30 ago I dropped my cable/phone/Internet bun­dle and went Inter­net only. At the time of my switch, the 25Mbps tier was priced at $49.99 for new cus­tomers. As a “val­ued, long-time cus­tomer,” I was able to get the tier for $54.99. For what­ever rea­son, I popped onto the web­site for my Inter­net provider, RCN, and noticed that it changed the Inter­net speed/pricing tiers.

Hmmmm. Inter­est­ing. Not happy that my exist­ing rate for 25Mbps ser­vice is $5 more than the new 50Mbps tier price, I called to see if RCN would move me up to the faster tier, since it was, essen­tially, the same price. If they couldn’t move me up to the faster tier, how about low­er­ing my bill to match the new price for 25Mpbs (about $15 less than what I’m cur­rently paying)?

Nope!

After being on hold for a long time I was even­tu­ally given the old song and dance about that price being for new cus­tomers. When I asked what RCN was doing to show appre­ci­a­tion for cus­tomers that have been with them for years, all I got was “I’m sorry.” I’m in a bit of a pickle because RCN actu­ally has the best rates in the area for the speed, so I will likely not pick up my router and go else­where. Nev­er­the­less, it’s still aggra­vat­ing to see these price. I can’t imag­ine that, say, Ver­i­zon Wire­less would change the pric­ing of its tiered minutes/data plans and not adjust all exist­ing cus­tomers to the new pric­ing — up or down.

Foot­note: I looked at RCN’s pric­ing for Inter­net ser­vice in the other mar­kets it serves — Boston, Chicago (any­one else notice some­thing screwy with Chicago’s prices?), Philadel­phia, New York. Wow. I guess I won’t com­plain too much.

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